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Stop Overworking After Vacation

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Kandi Wiens


Most of us know what it’s like to take a long vacation, and upon returning, dive back into our work with a fervor—working late nights, longer hours, or setting unrealistic expectations on ourselves to “make up for lost time.”

While it may be tempting to double down or to try to get back up to speed as quickly as possible while ignoring our needs, this is the worst thing we can do to avoid stress and burnout! (And undo all the rest and relaxation of our vacation.)

While this may stem from a well-meaning effort to relieve our team members of extra work or a desire to prove to clients that our dedication remains high, it’s best for everyone involved to avoid that post-vacation overwork, which can undermine all the effort we’re putting in.

So what’s the best way to keep our post-vacation rejuvenation and dive back into work?

Most of us know what it’s like to take a long vacation, and upon returning, dive back into our work with a fervor—working late nights, longer hours, or setting unrealistic expectations on ourselves to “make up for lost time.”

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